Marketing automation

5 Easy Ways to Increase Pardot Form Submissions

A form on a landing page or your website is often the final step in a nurturing process and represents the crucial point of conversion. According to Manifest, 81% of people will abandon a form after beginning to fill it out. And of that 81%, more than half (67%) will not return to complete the form. 

So how do we, as marketers, improve our game and increase conversions while decreasing form abandonment? By using five native tools at your disposal within the Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) forms tool.

Five Ways to Increase Pardot Form Submissions and Decrease Form Abandonment

When marketers first start using forms within Pardot, they’re probably inclined to keep things simple and have a primary focus on collecting information they see as required or important to their sales process. However, you can leverage a few things within Pardot to decrease form abandonment and up your marketing game. 

  1. Use Dependent Fields

Keep the form simple and limit the number of fields using dependent fields. When you are seeking relatable information based on specific field values, dependent fields are the best way to capture that additional insight.

For example, if you are a global company, you can ask for the user’s country. And if they respond with the United States, then you can ask for their state. Or if they respond with Canada, you can ask which province they are from. Whereas, if they respond with the United Kingdom, no additional information is required. 

Dependent fields eliminate unnecessary questions, shorten the form, and personalize the experience for each Prospect.

  1. Set Up Progressive Profiling

Another great way to help shorten your forms, but still collect the required information is through progressive profiling. This tool enables you to ask new questions based on each return to a form, eliminating previously completed questions from prior form fills. 

For example, if you already know their company, the next time they return to the form, you can now ask for a job title to dig in further. This is one of the best tools at your disposal as a marketer because it ensures a positive user experience for the Prospect and helps keep the sales team happy by collecting details for lead assignment, segmentation, and increased nurturing via targeted Engagement Studio Programs.

  1. Have Clear Calls to Action

Calls to action are the short persuasive text used on the form button to close the deal. You want to be straightforward while keeping it short and simple. I would recommend starting with a verb and following up with an adverb or subject thereafter. 

For example, a clear call to action could say:  “Download Your e-book Now” or “Subscribe Today.”

Ultimately, use language that promises them the delivery of something your reader wants. 

Form submission thank you page example
  1. Use Autoresponders

Creating an experience for Prospects is crucial in seeing them return to want more. This can be accomplished by ensuring that you follow through on your delivery when a form is completed through autoresponders and/or thank you pages. 

Take advantage of the redirect and follow-up by creating a personalized experience by offering them a thank you message, a downloaded asset, and/or highlighting similar content they may be interested in. 

By directing them to additional content, you can use your Progressive Profiling and they can gain additional insight into your organization and how you can help solve their issues.

  1. Enable Completion Actions

Completion Actions are similar to your Autoresponders, as they are unseen heroes of the form experience but play a critical role in delivering what was promised. A Completion Action is an action that Pardot will automatically make on your behalf as soon as the form is completed. 

Actions could include:

  • Delivering gated content
  • Adding to subscription lists
  • Notifying users
  • Adding prospects to nurture programs
  • Creating a task to follow up with the prospect

It’s the final touch to the entire experience and will keep your prospects returning for more.

Create Better Pardot Forms to Get More Conversions

With these out-of-the-box Pardot tools at your disposal, you can easily decrease form abandonment and increase Prospect engagement, growing your pipeline and improving your nurture game. 
Interested in learning more about how to get started or how to expand your Pardot form game? Contact us today!

Original article: 5 Easy Ways to Increase Pardot Form Submissions

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post 5 Easy Ways to Increase Pardot Form Submissions appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-23T21:06:51+00:00January 23rd, 2023|Categories: Forms & Form Handlers, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

Pardot Multivariate Testing Best Practices

Part of being a great marketer is to always evolve with your audience. Doing this intentionally is the key to an organization’s success. Luckily, Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) offers its customers Multivariate Testing, which measures the landing page performance over a period of time to determine the best variation.

What is Multivariate Testing?

The answer to this question is in the name. Multivariate Testing looks at multiple variables applied to several variations of Pardot Landing Pages to determine which version performs best. Once you have created your variations, they are randomly assigned to visitors to assess and track performance. 

How does Multivariate Testing Work?

To begin, you will want to determine which variables are most important to you and the team to measure. We recommend no more than three variables change per landing page. For example, some of the more popular variables may include the page layout, headline, call to action, form fields, colors, and logos. 

Build Your Pages to Test

Once you determine the variations, you will want to build a minimum of two landing pages. Remember to name your Landing Pages in a way that will differ them from one another for reporting at a later date. 

You will want to make your landing pages using the differing variations prior to enabling the Multivariate Test. Once you have created your Landing Pages, take the steps below to complete the Multivariate Testing process.

  1. Navigate to Marketing > Landing Pages > Multivariate Testing
  2. Name your test, including the purpose or end goal
  3. Select your Salesforce Campaign
  4. Provide a unique vanity URL
  5. Select the Landing Pages you wish to use and their weight percent (50/50 for two, or 33/33/33 for three)
  6. Click “Create Multivariate Test”
  7. Use the link generated to direct users to the landing page

Check the Reporting

For reporting, you want to ensure that the multivariate test runs long enough to receive a measurable sample size. Once you have reached an optimal size, you can go to Reports > Landing Pages to see the multivariate statistics, including page views, conversions, conversion rate, and the winning page. 

Don’t be surprised if you go through multiple variations and manipulations of the landing pages or specific elements on those landing pages in order to pinpoint the most ideal version. 

Multivariate Testing is a highly effective tool at the disposal of all Pardot users, and should be used routinely to measure performance and improve your audience targeting. This will likely result in a higher conversion rate and will show that you can grow with your audience.

Original article: Pardot Multivariate Testing Best Practices

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Pardot Multivariate Testing Best Practices appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-13T20:22:20+00:00January 13th, 2023|Categories: Emails & Templates, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Strategy|

Pardot WYSIWYG Editor Icon Glossary

The Pardot WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) Editor Icon Glossary saved me SO much time and energy when I was first learning how to build email in Pardot. Recently, I noticed this page had been archived and no good replacement could be found, so I thought I’d recreate this asset so new and experienced users can still reference it as much as needed. 

The Icon Glossary

These buttons and icons are universal across Pardot, wherever you may add content (classic email builder, forms, landing pages, etc.). These buttons and icons are available to help you style your copy.

Icon Function
Bold text.
Italicize text.
Underline text.
Strikethrough text.
Additional formatting options such as font size and line height.
Remove existing formatting.
Insert a link.
Remove a link. This icon is grayed out unless an existing link is selected. 
Insert an Anchor. This is a hyperlink that will take you to another section of the email.
View the source code. This button is helpful when manually entering or editing HTML. 
Insert an image.
Insert a merge field to personalize the content for the recipient.
Set your text color.
Set your background color. 
Insert a numbered list.
Insert a bulleted list.
Left align content.
Center align content.
Right align content.
Justify content. 
Paste as plain text. This strips all formatting from the text.
Paste from Word. This retains some formatting from Microsoft Word, but strips out superfluous code. See Copying Content from Word for more info.
Insert an HTML table.
Insert a horizontal line. 
Insert a special character.
Insert AddThis to allow recipients to share your email.
Insert Dynamic Content to personalize the content for the recipient.
Insert emojis.
Change or set your font name.
Change or set your font size.

I hope this makes building emails go a little more smoothly for you! If I missed any icons or if you have any questions, let us know in the comments!

Original article: Pardot WYSIWYG Editor Icon Glossary

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Pardot WYSIWYG Editor Icon Glossary appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-13T20:09:09+00:00January 13th, 2023|Categories: Emails & Templates, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

The Basics of A/B Testing in Pardot

Marketing A/B Testing is far from being anything new. In fact, it’s been around for quite some time. 

A/B Testing as we know it today first came about in the 1990s and has been evolving ever since, while still staying true to the same core concepts — comparing two versions of something to figure out which has the best performance.

In this post, we’ll cover the basics of marketing A/B testing and how you can use it in your Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) instance to optimize your marketing assets.

What is Marketing A/B Testing?

As previously stated, A/B Testing compares one email to another and via algorithms, decides which version performed best. More specifically, you want to change a single variable between the two emails, keeping everything else the same. 

For example, does “Learn More” or “Download Now” drive more traffic via your call-to-action? Or, perhaps you want to determine whether a subject line that reads “Urgent: Read Now” is more appealing to your audience or “Time is running out” is the better way to go. 

How does A/B Testing Work in Pardot?

By testing your audience’s responses, you are able to customize your content based upon email performance as well as user preferences to personalize their experience

Within Pardot, you can easily apply marketing A/B testing to your emails to configure a variety of variations based upon:

  • Imagery
  • Subject lines
  • Call-to-actions
  • Image placement
  • Image content
  • Email send time

The thing about A/B Testing is that you can always be using it because your audience is always evolving, and as a marketer, it is your responsibility to remain responsive to that customer base. Luckily, Pardot’s A/B Testing functionality is fully automated and easy to use.

Within the automation platform, you need to start by determining which variable you wish to test —  headline, banner image, subject line, etc. From there, you need to choose your metric — opens or clicks. Finally, you decide what percent of your audience you want to test these emails on (up to 50% of the segmentation). Once these factors are decided, it is time to run the test. 

For example, let’s go with subject line as our variable and opens as our metrics. Based upon which version had the most opens, Pardot will automatically deploy the “winning” email to the remaining audience — the email with the most opens.

You’ll find the checkbox to enable A/B testing in the Basic Info menu within your email draft.

How can your company use A/B Testing?

This simple automation innate to Pardot can help businesses of all sizes to better target their audience and increase actionability on their part. As our world becomes more and more digital, A/B Testing easily lends itself to marketing teams worldwide to evaluate marketing’s effort and effectiveness. 

The important thing to note is that one test is never enough. Always keep testing and changing with your audience so you are not left behind.

A/B testing is one of the most powerful tools Pardot offers its users, and it should be taking full advantage of. With that said, be mindful that you are choosing only one criteria and one metric for each A/B test that you run to see the most effective results.

Let us know your thoughts on using marketing A/B testing in the comments section.

Original article: The Basics of A/B Testing in Pardot

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post The Basics of A/B Testing in Pardot appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-11T22:17:33+00:00January 11th, 2023|Categories: Emails & Templates, Getting Started, Pardot, revive|

Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration

The Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) and Salesforce integration can be used to pass data back and forth between Pardot and Salesforce. In this article, learn everything about the Salesforce connector including what objects are synced, what happens if the prospect already exists in Pardot and how Pardot, and how to map Salesforce users to Pardot users.

Two different sync methods

Objects that sync from Salesforce to Pardot

  • Leads
  • Contacts
  • Accounts
  • Opportunities
  • Campaigns
  • Custom Objects (Available in: Pardot Advanced Edition and Available for an additional cost in: Pardot Plus Edition)

Synced but requires mapping in Pardot

  • Users
  • Custom Fields

Syncing prospects from Pardot to Salesforce

A prospect is synced to Salesforce when the record has been assigned to a user. A user can be assigned using a completion action or by using an automation rule.

Since Pardot uses email address as its unique identifier**, Pardot will check to see if there’s a contact in Salesforce with the same email address and then check if there’s a lead with the same email address. If there’s no email address that matches the prospect in Salesforce, Pardot will create a new lead in Salesforce. This can be illustrated with this flow chart.

You can also navigate to the connector settings and run a full sync.  Learn more about what causes a prospect to sync from Pardot to Salesforce here.

** If your Pardot account allows for multiple prospects with the same email address, there are some requirements for the record to sync to Salesforce

Syncing Prospects from Salesforce to Pardot

By default new leads and contacts within Salesforce will not sync over to Pardot automatically. There are 3 ways to sync new leads and contacts from Salesforce to Pardot:

  • By clicking the send to Pardot button on the lead or the contact record in Salesforce.
  • By manually uploading the lead or contact’s email address into Pardot.
  • Enable the option in the Salesforce connector to ‘automatically create prospects if they are created as a lead or contact in Salesforce.com’. This feature is not retroactive so you will need to upload a CSV into Pardot that includes the CRM ID and email address to trigger Salesforce records to sync. 
  • Run a full sync (Pardot Settings > Connectors > Gear Icon > Sync All Prospects)

Once the Pardot prospect and the Salesforce lead/contact are connected, Pardot will check for changes in Salesforce every 2-4 minutes. 

Hot Tip: Learn more about Salesforce and Pardot sync behavior in this blog post.

Connected Campaigns: Salesforce Campaigns and Pardot Campaigns 

The launch of Connected Campaigns in 2019 streamlined how Salesforce and Pardot campaigns are used, allowing management of campaigns to be managed within Salesforce. Plus, if you enable Campaign Member Sync your prospects will be added to campaigns as campaign members. 

Prospects can be added to a Salesforce campaign using the following methods:

When you set up a rule using one of these methods you will be able to see the action criteria to add to Salesforce campaign.

Mapping Fields Salesforce Fields to Pardot Fields

When you verify your Salesforce connector with Pardot, the default fields for leads/contacts and accounts are set up automatically. Any custom fields will need to be created in Pardot and mapped to the corresponding Salesforce field.

Mapping Salesforce Users to Pardot Users

Each Salesforce user will need to be created in Pardot as well, so you can assign Pardot prospects to a sales rep. You can create users in 4 ways:

  • Manage User Sync In Pardot (Pardot Settings > Connectors > User Sync) by mapping Salesforce Profiles to Pardot Roles
  • Manage User Sync In Salesforce 
  • Create directly in Pardot (Pardot Settings > User Management > Users)

Troubleshooting

I changed a contact’s email address in Salesforce, but the change isn’t syncing to Pardot.

This is the expected behavior of the Salesforce connector unless you have the setting Automatically change email addresses in Pardot to reflect changes in Salesforce.com enabled under the Salesforce connector settings.

My Prospects aren’t syncing to Salesforce.

First, check to see that there wasn’t an error while syncing the prospects to Salesforce. You can view sync errors by navigating to Pardot Settings > Connectors > Sync Errors

Fix any errors and try syncing the record with Salesforce again.

If you have no errors, make sure the record is assigned to a user. You can check this by clicking into the prospect in Pardot and looking for an assigned user under the Insight table.

Have other questions about the Pardot and Salesforce Integration? Ask in the comments!

Original article: Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-06T16:03:03+00:00January 6th, 2023|Categories: Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration

The Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) and Salesforce integration can be used to pass data back and forth between Pardot and Salesforce. In this article, learn everything about the Salesforce connector including what objects are synced, what happens if the prospect already exists in Pardot and how Pardot, and how to map Salesforce users to Pardot users.

Two different sync methods

Objects that sync from Salesforce to Pardot

  • Leads
  • Contacts
  • Accounts
  • Opportunities
  • Campaigns
  • Custom Objects (Available in: Pardot Advanced Edition and Available for an additional cost in: Pardot Plus Edition)

Synced but requires mapping in Pardot

  • Users
  • Custom Fields

Syncing prospects from Pardot to Salesforce

A prospect is synced to Salesforce when the record has been assigned to a user. A user can be assigned using a completion action or by using an automation rule.

Since Pardot uses email address as its unique identifier**, Pardot will check to see if there’s a contact in Salesforce with the same email address and then check if there’s a lead with the same email address. If there’s no email address that matches the prospect in Salesforce, Pardot will create a new lead in Salesforce. This can be illustrated with this flow chart.

You can also navigate to the connector settings and run a full sync.  Learn more about what causes a prospect to sync from Pardot to Salesforce here.

** If your Pardot account allows for multiple prospects with the same email address, there are some requirements for the record to sync to Salesforce

Syncing Prospects from Salesforce to Pardot

By default new leads and contacts within Salesforce will not sync over to Pardot automatically. There are 3 ways to sync new leads and contacts from Salesforce to Pardot:

  • By clicking the send to Pardot button on the lead or the contact record in Salesforce.
  • By manually uploading the lead or contact’s email address into Pardot.
  • Enable the option in the Salesforce connector to ‘automatically create prospects if they are created as a lead or contact in Salesforce.com’. This feature is not retroactive so you will need to upload a CSV into Pardot that includes the CRM ID and email address to trigger Salesforce records to sync. 
  • Run a full sync (Pardot Settings > Connectors > Gear Icon > Sync All Prospects)

Once the Pardot prospect and the Salesforce lead/contact are connected, Pardot will check for changes in Salesforce every 2-4 minutes. 

Hot Tip: Learn more about Salesforce and Pardot sync behavior in this blog post.

Connected Campaigns: Salesforce Campaigns and Pardot Campaigns 

The launch of Connected Campaigns in 2019 streamlined how Salesforce and Pardot campaigns are used, allowing management of campaigns to be managed within Salesforce. Plus, if you enable Campaign Member Sync your prospects will be added to campaigns as campaign members. 

Prospects can be added to a Salesforce campaign using the following methods:

When you set up a rule using one of these methods you will be able to see the action criteria to add to Salesforce campaign.

Mapping Fields Salesforce Fields to Pardot Fields

When you verify your Salesforce connector with Pardot, the default fields for leads/contacts and accounts are set up automatically. Any custom fields will need to be created in Pardot and mapped to the corresponding Salesforce field.

Mapping Salesforce Users to Pardot Users

Each Salesforce user will need to be created in Pardot as well, so you can assign Pardot prospects to a sales rep. You can create users in 4 ways:

  • Manage User Sync In Pardot (Pardot Settings > Connectors > User Sync) by mapping Salesforce Profiles to Pardot Roles
  • Manage User Sync In Salesforce 
  • Create directly in Pardot (Pardot Settings > User Management > Users)

Troubleshooting

I changed a contact’s email address in Salesforce, but the change isn’t syncing to Pardot.

This is the expected behavior of the Salesforce connector unless you have the setting Automatically change email addresses in Pardot to reflect changes in Salesforce.com enabled under the Salesforce connector settings.

My Prospects aren’t syncing to Salesforce.

First, check to see that there wasn’t an error while syncing the prospects to Salesforce. You can view sync errors by navigating to Pardot Settings > Connectors > Sync Errors

Fix any errors and try syncing the record with Salesforce again.

If you have no errors, make sure the record is assigned to a user. You can check this by clicking into the prospect in Pardot and looking for an assigned user under the Insight table.

Have other questions about the Pardot and Salesforce Integration? Ask in the comments!

Original article: Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Everything You Need to Know About the Pardot and Salesforce Integration appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-06T16:03:03+00:00January 6th, 2023|Categories: Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

Forms Are Great, But Confirmed Opt-In Is Better

Are you spending hours upon hours curating engaging, click-worthy content, only to notice that you have low engagement, high unsubscribes and spam complaints? A list of opted-in prospects is great, but what happens when they input false or incorrect contact information, or sign up on a whim. By setting up Confirmed Opt-In (also known as Double Opt-In), you can be at ease knowing you’re collecting email addresses from a valid and monitored inbox, and of prospects who want to receive and read your content.

What is Confirmed Opt-In?

A Confirmed Opt-In (COI) is a process where a marketer obtains explicit consent from prospects to receive marketing emails. 

Setting it up adds a few more steps to the Single Opt-in process but is generally easy:

  1. A contact fills out your form and selects the consent check-box (single opt-in)
  2. They receive the opt-in confirmation email, open it and click the button to confirm.
  3. Their record is updated as an opted-in contact, along with other important details like when they confirmed their opt-in.

It may be a regulatory requirement in certain regions, so make sure you do your research to understand whether your prospects require a COI. It’s currently required in Austria, Germany, Greece, Switzerland, Luxembourg and Norway (source).

Benefits of COI for Email Marketing

While it can take more time to set up, the payoff is worth the effort:

  • Higher email engagement rates (opens/clicks): Prospects are interested in receiving your marketing emails and are more likely to purchase your products/services.
  • Lower bounce rates/spam complaints and a better sending reputation: No fake emails entering your database and causing high bounce rates or spam traps that end up harming your sending reputation. 
  • A well-documented record of opt-in: With this auditable trail, if a recipient reports the email as spam, you will have proof to support your list’s opt-in integrity.
  • And generally a good, clean database. 

Setting up Confirmed Opt-In

There are a number of ways to set up COI. Here’s a basic overview of how to set it up in Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) instance. 

  1. Create two lists to capture opt-ins
    • Confirmed Opt-in
    • Not confirmed Opt-in
  2. Create a landing page that a prospect is directed to once they confirm their opt-in.
  3. Create a custom redirect link that sends prospects to the landing page above
    • Add the following completion actions to the custom redirect:
      1. Remove prospect from Not confirmed Opt-in list
      2. Add prospect to Confirmed Opt-in list
  4. Set up an auto-responder email to capture COI
    • Add the custom redirect link (identified in the above step) to the call to action button to capture the COI
  5. Add the following completion actions to the form/form handler that captures consent to receive Marketing Communications:
    • Add prospects to the Not confirmed Opt-in list 
    • Send auto-responder email to capture their COI

Quality or Quantity

COI is a great way to level up your email marketing strategy; ensuring a healthy database full of ‘real’ and engaged prospects. And with sales and marketing always looking for quality over quantity, COI will ensure it gets you there.

What questions do you have about Confirmed Opt-in? Let’s hear it in the comments below.

Original article: Forms Are Great, But Confirmed Opt-In Is Better

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Forms Are Great, But Confirmed Opt-In Is Better appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-05T17:28:14+00:00January 5th, 2023|Categories: Forms & Form Handlers, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot

Your website is one of your most important demand generation assets and a blog is a great way to increase your online presence by making you more visible on Google. It’s also a great way to bring prospects into your database to expand the top of your funnel. 

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to set up your blog with a Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) form, how to create a blog welcome email, and tips to automate blog digest emails.

How do you want your blog readers to subscribe?

There are many ways you can get your readers to subscribe to your blog. Some companies use a popup form when you visit a blog post, which has proven to be effective and other companies make it more subtle. Here are some different methods which will give you inspiration on how you should add the form to your blog.

Example 1: In a sidebar 

Pardot lets you subscribe to their blog by entering in your email address in the sidebar.

Example 2: At the end of each blog

Hootsuite adds their blog subscription form to the bottom of each blog post. They also only ask for your email address and have some nice icons, so it’s clear what you’re signing up for.

Example 3: In the footer

Engagio has a “sticky footer” at the bottom of their blog page, as well as on each blog post to get readers to subscribe. The bold yellow color also draws your attention to the subscription form without being too invasive and they provide you with a close button to hide the form.

Example 4: With an automation

Asana uses a subscription form that slides out at the bottom when you scroll down about 80%. I like how the animation captures the attention of the readers and how they incorporate Facebook and Twitter buttons beneath the email sign up.

Example 5: In multiple spots

Shopify uses two slightly different methods for capturing their blog subscribers. When you visit their main blog page you can subscribe right from their header.

They also have a subscription form in the sidebar of each post. I like that they include some social proof in the subscription form in the sidebar and it’s clear what I can expect them to send me if I give them my email address.

What fields should you capture?

Standard fields

The shorter the form the more likely you will get your readers to subscribe to your blog. Most blogs only ask for an email address, but some also will ask you for your first and last name for more personalized blog digest emails.

Hidden fields

Your standard source fields should be on your blog subscription form, just like every Pardot form you create.

If you opt to have a subscription form on every blog post, I also like to add hidden fields for blog post title and blog post category. With my blog, for example, I have a subscription form at the bottom of each post and I use custom code in WordPress to automatically populate the hidden fields with the post title and post category. This way I can pull reports in Pardot to see what type of content is generating more blog subscribers and what posts have generated the most blog subscribers.

Here’s an example of populating hidden fields with WordPress blog information. Note: This method is only possible while using Pardot Form Handlers.

<input type="hidden" name="post-category" value="<?php the_category(); ?>" />

<input type="hidden" name="post-category" value="<?php single_post_title(); ?>" />

The Pardot implementation

Now that I’ve given you some examples of what form fields to include in your form and some methods for blog subscription forms, it’s time to show you how to build it out in Pardot.

Pardot Form Handlers vs. Pardot Form embed

There are some advantages and disadvantages for each form method. Embedded Pardot forms allow you to update the form directly in the Pardot form editor and the changes are live on your site as soon as you save the form. However, they also are embedded on your site using an iFrame, which means that certain functionality might not be available. Pardot form handlers are much more flexible and allow you to use your own HTML code to send data to Pardot.

When integrating your blog with Pardot the best form method to use, in my opinion, is Pardot form handlers, for a couple of reasons:

  • Changes don’t need to be made to the blog form regularly
  • It’s easier to have the form match your website/blog
  • Many blogging platforms have plugins you can use for blog subscription forms that will work well with Pardot form handlers

Create a campaign dedicated to blog subscribers

Create a campaign to attribute your blog as a lead source for any new subscribers. Your form and new subscribers should be assigned to the campaign in Pardot and/or Salesforce, depending on your lead attribution processes. 

Create a Pardot Form or a Form Handler

In this tutorial, I will be using a Pardot form handler. You can also use a regular Pardot form if you prefer.

Create a Pardot form handler with a descriptive name. I called mine “Blog Subscription Form.” Select your new campaign, map the fields that you want to add to the form and click save. Note: Completion Actions and some other settings will be updated later on.

Add the form to your blog

There are many tools that allow you to add forms to your blog, but it depends what platform you use. Here’s a list of some popular plugins that will help you add your Pardot form to your blog.

  • PopUp Domination can be used to create a popup subscription form on your blog. You can use any HTML you want, which means it will work perfectly with your Pardot form handler. 
  • Sumo is another option that will work on any type of blog platform. They also offer many different ways to display the subscription form on your blog.

While I’m a big fan of these tools, if you have a developer available the best option is to get them to implement your Pardot form on your blog using custom code. Depending on the method you choose it should be pretty easy for a developer to implement your form and it means you don’t have to pay a monthly subscription fee for using these tools.

Create a Thank You page

The next step is to create a Thank You page that the form will direct to when someone subscribes to the blog. I recommend that you create it on your website (instead of a Pardot landing page), to ensure it has the same look as your blog.

Once your Thank You page is created, copy and paste the URL into the Success location in the Pardot form handler.

Create a blog welcome email

A blog welcome email is a great way to promote more of your blog content. Choose a couple of your popular posts or create a digest of curated content your readers might be interested in.

When a reader subscribes to my blog, I send them a welcome email with some of my top Pardot blog posts. Click here to see what it looks like (and feel free to copy and paste the HTML to create your own welcome email).

Once you have your blog welcome email created add a completion action to your Pardot form to send an autoresponder email.

Emailing subscribers: Automated vs. Manual

Now that your form is set up on your site and your welcome email is ready, it’s time to figure out how you’re going to send notification emails when there’s a new blog post. There are two ways you can send out blog posts: 

  1. Automatically using a third-party application, or 
  2. Manually, since Pardot doesn’t have an RSS feed integration.

For my blog, I send out all my blog digest emails manually, since I like to have control over what’s sent. However, I only post about once or twice a week, so it’s pretty manageable.

Automated blog posts using Feed Otter

If you opt to go with the automated route, Feed Otter provides a full RSS integration with Pardot. You can quickly build, schedule, and email your blog subscribers notifying them of a new post, a weekly digest, or a monthly newsletter.

Manual blog post emails

Manual blog post emails require you to create an email each time there is a new blog post, or if you post a lot during the week, you can do a digest of all the new posts, once a week. It can be time-consuming, but if you have a good email template setup and a defined process the whole thing doesn’t take very long. If you’re going to go the manual route, here are some tips:

  • Create a simple, one-column email template, so you don’t have to spend time messing with formatting. This is the template I use for my blog posts.
  • Create an email that you can copy each time you need to send a blog email. This will contain all the settings (from address, list, etc.) you need to send the blog email.

Questions?

Send me a tweet @jennamolby or leave a comment below.

Note: This post was originally written in November 2016 and updated January 2023.

Original article: How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-04T19:34:16+00:00January 4th, 2023|Categories: Emails & Templates, Forms & Form Handlers, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot

Your website is one of your most important demand generation assets and a blog is a great way to increase your online presence by making you more visible on Google. It’s also a great way to bring prospects into your database to expand the top of your funnel. 

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to set up your blog with a Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot) form, how to create a blog welcome email, and tips to automate blog digest emails.

How do you want your blog readers to subscribe?

There are many ways you can get your readers to subscribe to your blog. Some companies use a popup form when you visit a blog post, which has proven to be effective and other companies make it more subtle. Here are some different methods which will give you inspiration on how you should add the form to your blog.

Example 1: In a sidebar 

Pardot lets you subscribe to their blog by entering in your email address in the sidebar.

Example 2: At the end of each blog

Hootsuite adds their blog subscription form to the bottom of each blog post. They also only ask for your email address and have some nice icons, so it’s clear what you’re signing up for.

Example 3: In the footer

Engagio has a “sticky footer” at the bottom of their blog page, as well as on each blog post to get readers to subscribe. The bold yellow color also draws your attention to the subscription form without being too invasive and they provide you with a close button to hide the form.

Example 4: With an automation

Asana uses a subscription form that slides out at the bottom when you scroll down about 80%. I like how the animation captures the attention of the readers and how they incorporate Facebook and Twitter buttons beneath the email sign up.

Example 5: In multiple spots

Shopify uses two slightly different methods for capturing their blog subscribers. When you visit their main blog page you can subscribe right from their header.

They also have a subscription form in the sidebar of each post. I like that they include some social proof in the subscription form in the sidebar and it’s clear what I can expect them to send me if I give them my email address.

What fields should you capture?

Standard fields

The shorter the form the more likely you will get your readers to subscribe to your blog. Most blogs only ask for an email address, but some also will ask you for your first and last name for more personalized blog digest emails.

Hidden fields

Your standard source fields should be on your blog subscription form, just like every Pardot form you create.

If you opt to have a subscription form on every blog post, I also like to add hidden fields for blog post title and blog post category. With my blog, for example, I have a subscription form at the bottom of each post and I use custom code in WordPress to automatically populate the hidden fields with the post title and post category. This way I can pull reports in Pardot to see what type of content is generating more blog subscribers and what posts have generated the most blog subscribers.

Here’s an example of populating hidden fields with WordPress blog information. Note: This method is only possible while using Pardot Form Handlers.

<input type="hidden" name="post-category" value="<?php the_category(); ?>" />

<input type="hidden" name="post-category" value="<?php single_post_title(); ?>" />

The Pardot implementation

Now that I’ve given you some examples of what form fields to include in your form and some methods for blog subscription forms, it’s time to show you how to build it out in Pardot.

Pardot Form Handlers vs. Pardot Form embed

There are some advantages and disadvantages for each form method. Embedded Pardot forms allow you to update the form directly in the Pardot form editor and the changes are live on your site as soon as you save the form. However, they also are embedded on your site using an iFrame, which means that certain functionality might not be available. Pardot form handlers are much more flexible and allow you to use your own HTML code to send data to Pardot.

When integrating your blog with Pardot the best form method to use, in my opinion, is Pardot form handlers, for a couple of reasons:

  • Changes don’t need to be made to the blog form regularly
  • It’s easier to have the form match your website/blog
  • Many blogging platforms have plugins you can use for blog subscription forms that will work well with Pardot form handlers

Create a campaign dedicated to blog subscribers

Create a campaign to attribute your blog as a lead source for any new subscribers. Your form and new subscribers should be assigned to the campaign in Pardot and/or Salesforce, depending on your lead attribution processes. 

Create a Pardot Form or a Form Handler

In this tutorial, I will be using a Pardot form handler. You can also use a regular Pardot form if you prefer.

Create a Pardot form handler with a descriptive name. I called mine “Blog Subscription Form.” Select your new campaign, map the fields that you want to add to the form and click save. Note: Completion Actions and some other settings will be updated later on.

Add the form to your blog

There are many tools that allow you to add forms to your blog, but it depends what platform you use. Here’s a list of some popular plugins that will help you add your Pardot form to your blog.

  • PopUp Domination can be used to create a popup subscription form on your blog. You can use any HTML you want, which means it will work perfectly with your Pardot form handler. 
  • Sumo is another option that will work on any type of blog platform. They also offer many different ways to display the subscription form on your blog.

While I’m a big fan of these tools, if you have a developer available the best option is to get them to implement your Pardot form on your blog using custom code. Depending on the method you choose it should be pretty easy for a developer to implement your form and it means you don’t have to pay a monthly subscription fee for using these tools.

Create a Thank You page

The next step is to create a Thank You page that the form will direct to when someone subscribes to the blog. I recommend that you create it on your website (instead of a Pardot landing page), to ensure it has the same look as your blog.

Once your Thank You page is created, copy and paste the URL into the Success location in the Pardot form handler.

Create a blog welcome email

A blog welcome email is a great way to promote more of your blog content. Choose a couple of your popular posts or create a digest of curated content your readers might be interested in.

When a reader subscribes to my blog, I send them a welcome email with some of my top Pardot blog posts. Click here to see what it looks like (and feel free to copy and paste the HTML to create your own welcome email).

Once you have your blog welcome email created add a completion action to your Pardot form to send an autoresponder email.

Emailing subscribers: Automated vs. Manual

Now that your form is set up on your site and your welcome email is ready, it’s time to figure out how you’re going to send notification emails when there’s a new blog post. There are two ways you can send out blog posts: 

  1. Automatically using a third-party application, or 
  2. Manually, since Pardot doesn’t have an RSS feed integration.

For my blog, I send out all my blog digest emails manually, since I like to have control over what’s sent. However, I only post about once or twice a week, so it’s pretty manageable.

Automated blog posts using Feed Otter

If you opt to go with the automated route, Feed Otter provides a full RSS integration with Pardot. You can quickly build, schedule, and email your blog subscribers notifying them of a new post, a weekly digest, or a monthly newsletter.

Manual blog post emails

Manual blog post emails require you to create an email each time there is a new blog post, or if you post a lot during the week, you can do a digest of all the new posts, once a week. It can be time-consuming, but if you have a good email template setup and a defined process the whole thing doesn’t take very long. If you’re going to go the manual route, here are some tips:

  • Create a simple, one-column email template, so you don’t have to spend time messing with formatting. This is the template I use for my blog posts.
  • Create an email that you can copy each time you need to send a blog email. This will contain all the settings (from address, list, etc.) you need to send the blog email.

Questions?

Send me a tweet @jennamolby or leave a comment below.

Note: This post was originally written in November 2016 and updated January 2023.

Original article: How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post How to Integrate Your Blog With Pardot appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-04T19:34:16+00:00January 4th, 2023|Categories: Emails & Templates, Forms & Form Handlers, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|

Inspiration: Using Pardot for Event Registration

Recently, I was challenged with creating a landing page for event registration using Marketing Cloud Account Engagement (Pardot). The event had 15+ roundtable sessions in the morning (within 2-time slots) and an option to register for the afternoon session (keynote, happy hour etc). Here’s a sneak peek into how I built it along with some code if you want to try building something similar for your next event.

VIEW DEMO

How it Works

Before we get into the details, here’s a high-level breakdown of how the page works.

  • A user clicks on the ‘register’ button to sign up for a roundtable, the roundtable name is populated in a hidden form field.
  • A user clicks on the ‘register’ button to sign up for the conference, a hidden form field is set to TRUE
  • A user then enters their information into a form. The data is sent to Pardot using a form handler.
  • Users who signed up for at least one roundtable are sent a Pardot email that contains a “thanks for registering” message, the name(s) of the selected roundtable(s) and a calendar invite.
  • Users who didn’t sign up for any roundtables, but signed up to attend the conference, are sent a “thank you” email with a calendar invite.

Pardot Setup

Field Creation

First, I needed to create a couple of new fields in Pardot:

  1. Roundtable Name 1: This field will contain the name of the roundtable the attendee selects for the first time slot.
  2. Roundtable Name 2: This field will contain the name of the roundtable the attendee selects for the second time slot.
  3. Registered For Conference: This field is a checkbox (true or false) which will indicate that the attendee has selected to attend the conference.

Form Handler Setup

I opted to use a form handler instead of a Pardot form, so I could easily customize my form.

Field Mappings

I added all the standard fields to the form handler (first name, last name, company name, job title, opt-in, and email address). I also added the 3 new custom fields (roundtable name 1, roundtable name 2, registered for conference) and marked them as not required since the attendee doesn’t have to go to all 3 events.

pardot-form-inspiration-field-mappings

Completion Actions

I added 2 completion actions, the first one is to sync the prospect to an SFDC campaign with the status of “registered”, the second completion action is to send me an email alert when someone registers. The email notification helped me easily determine which roundtables are most popular.

Thanks for registering email confirmation

I created 2 ‘thanks for registering emails’ and set them up to be sent via an automation rule.

  1. Conference Only: This email is sent out to everyone who didn’t select to participate in any of the roundtables.
  2. Roundtables: This email is sent out to everyone who registered for at least one roundtable session.

Conference Only Email

The conference only email was pretty simple. It contained a thank you message along with calendar invites.

The email was sent using an automation rule that checks if “conference only” is true and if both roundtable fields are empty.

pardot-automation-rule-conference-only

Roundtable Email

The roundtable email contains a thank you message as well as the name(s) of the roundtables the user has selected to attend. The names of the roundtables are dynamically added to the email using a variable tag.

roundtable-selection-pardot-inspiration

The email was sent using an automation rule that checks if the roundtable 1 field is not empty OR the roundtable 2 field is not empty.

pardot-completion-action-send-roundtable-email

Building the Landing Page

Building the landing page was the difficult part. I didn’t want to include the roundtable names in a drop down menu in a form, so I came up with the idea to make the registration process like a shopping cart.

VIEW DEMO

The HTML

I used Bootstrap as my framework for the landing page and used Bootstrap Panels for a clean way to display the roundtable names and descriptions.

<div class="panel panel-default">
    <div class="panel-heading">
      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 1</span></h3>
    </div>
    <div class="panel-body">
      <div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-9">
          Pellentesque tempus aliquet nisi in sollicitudin. Aliquam tempor ligula vel mattis cursus. Cras lacus est, facilisis feugiat rhoncus ac, condimentum a ex. Aliquam elementum, nisi non dapibus dapibus, neque mi mattis libero, nec mattis tortor elit ut sapien. Donec nisi nulla, feugiat non dignissim aliquet, efficitur eget lorem. Proin id pellentesque ante.
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>

Since there were 2 time slots for the roundtables, I wrapped each of the sections in a DIV with a class of first-session and second-session.

<div class="sessions first-session">
  <div class="panel panel-default">
    <div class="panel-heading">
      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 1</span></h3>
    </div>
    <div class="panel-body">
      <div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-9">
          Pellentesque tempus aliquet nisi in sollicitudin. Aliquam tempor ligula vel mattis cursus. Cras lacus est, facilisis feugiat rhoncus ac, condimentum a ex. Aliquam elementum, nisi non dapibus dapibus, neque mi mattis libero, nec mattis tortor elit ut sapien. Donec nisi nulla, feugiat non dignissim aliquet, efficitur eget lorem. Proin id pellentesque ante.
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
        </div>
      </div>
      
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="panel panel-default">
    <div class="panel-heading">
      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 2</span></h3>
    </div>
    <div class="panel-body">
 	<div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-9">
     	Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas lacinia, dolor scelerisque commodo sodales, augue lectus luctus turpis, id pharetra mauris libero at urna. Vestibulum in magna aliquam, interdum diam eu, pretium odio. Curabitur a porta metus, eget porttitor nibh. Maecenas porta condimentum lacus, in bibendum augue euismod sit amet.
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
        </div>
      </div>
   	
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="panel panel-default">
    <div class="panel-heading">
      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 3</span></h3>
    </div>
    <div class="panel-body">
 	<div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-9">
          Phasellus nec neque scelerisque, semper odio a, fringilla leo. Sed cursus lectus non purus cursus tempus. Cras eu blandit lectus. Proin sodales justo et felis consectetur, sed ultrices nibh imperdiet. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Sed aliquam congue feugiat. Nam elit orci, congue et maximus sed, commodo quis arcu. Suspendisse iaculis eros viverra consectetur pretium.
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
        </div>
      </div>
   	
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="panel panel-default">
    <div class="panel-heading">
      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 4</span></h3>
    </div>
    <div class="panel-body">
      <div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-9">
          Cras sapien leo, sodales vitae congue quis, semper ac ligula. Integer molestie fermentum suscipit. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nulla odio ligula, aliquam eget leo eget, sollicitudin fringilla ante.
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
        </div>
      </div>   	
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Sticking with the ‘add to shopping cart’ feel, I wanted to add a “your agenda” section to the bottom left corner of the page that populates based on the sessions you select. This can be done using my slide out lead generation form with a couple modifications.

<div class="slideout-form">
  <div class="slideoutform-header">
    <h3>Your Agenda</h3>
    <div class="close">X</div>
  </div>
  <div class="slideout-content">
      <div class="session-name-1"></div>
      <div class="session-name-2"></div>
      <div class="text-center">
      <a href="#registration" class="btn btn-white">Register</a>
      </div>
  </div>
</div>

Finally, I added the form to the bottom of the page, which uses a Pardot form handler and hidden fields for roundtable name and conference registration.

<div class="panel panel-default">
  <form action="" method="post" id="regForm">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <label>First Name <span class="required">*</span></label>
            <input class="form-control" name="firstname" required/>
        </div>
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <label>Last Name <span class="required">*</span></label>
            <input class="form-control" name="lastname" required/>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <label>Email Address <span class="required">*</span></label>
            <input class="form-control" name="email" required/>
        </div>
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <label>Company <span class="required">*</span></label>
            <input class="form-control" name="company" required/>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <label>Job Title <span class="required">*</span></label>
            <input class="form-control" name="jobtitle" required/>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-12 optin-container">
            <input type="checkbox" name="optin" /> Opt-in to receive communications from Sample Company including exclusive event invites, product and company updates and more
        </div>
    </div>
    <input type="hidden" name="roundtable1" />
    <input type="hidden" name="roundtable2" />
    <input type="hidden" name="eventreg" />
  <div class="footer-reg text-center">
    <input type="submit" class="btn btn-register btn-large" value="Register" />
  </div>
  <div class="required required-msg">
 
  </div>
  </form>
</div>

JavaScript

I used jQuery to add some logic to my page. There was a fair bit of logic to consider for the roundtable registration, including:

  • Changing the button style when a session is selected.
  • Hiding the rest of the ‘register’ buttons within that time slot, so the attendee can only select one session.
  • Displaying the name of the selected roundtable in the agenda section.
  • Populating the hidden fields with the name of the selected roundtable.
 // Show the Agenda
  $('.btn-select, .btn-conference').click(function(event) {
    $('.slideout-form').slideDown();
  })
  // Session Selection Session 1
  $('.first-session .btn-select').click(function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      $(this).addClass('session-selected');
      $(this).removeClass('btn-select');
      $(this).text('selected');
      $('.first-session .btn-select').hide();
      var selectedsession1 = $(this).closest('.panel').find('.rountable-name').text();
      $('.session-name-1').html('<div class="agenda-item"><h5>9:00am - 11:00am</h5><div class="agenda-content">' + selectedsession1 + '</div></div>');
      $('input[name=session1]').val(selectedsession1);
  });
 
  // Session Selection Session 2
  $('.second-session .btn-select').click(function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      $(this).addClass('session-selected');
      $(this).removeClass('btn-select');
      $(this).text('selected');
      $('.second-session .btn-select').hide();
      var selectedsession2 = $(this).closest('.panel').find('.rountable-name').text();
      $('.session-name-2').html('<div class="agenda-item"><h5>11:00am - NOON</h5><div class="agenda-content">' + selectedsession2 + '</div></div>');
      $('input[name=session2]').val(selectedsession2);
  });

The entire HTML code

I created a new landing page in Account Engagement to host the registration page. All the CSS, JavaScript and Bootstrap files were also uploaded in Account Engagement to keep everything in one place.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<meta content="IE=edge" http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible"><meta content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" name="viewport">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="https://jennamolby.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/favicon.ico" />
<!-- The above 3 meta tags *must* come first in the head; any other head content must come *after* these tags -->
<title>Pardot Event Registration Inspiration</title>
<!-- Bootstrap -->
<link href="bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet">
<link href="pardot-registration-inspiration-styles.css" rel="stylesheet">
 
<!-- HTML5 shim and Respond.js for IE8 support of HTML5 elements and media queries --><!--[if lt IE 9]>
      <script src="https://oss.maxcdn.com/html5shiv/3.7.2/html5shiv.min.js"></script>
      <script src="https://oss.maxcdn.com/respond/1.4.2/respond.min.js"></script>
    <![endif]-->
    </head>
    <body>
      <div class="header">
        <div class="container">
          <div class="row">
            <div class="col-sm-12 text-center">
                  Example Pardot Registration Page
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
        <div class="container">
          <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-9 centered-columns">
              <h2> 9:00am - 10:00am</h2>
              <div class="sessions first-session">
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 1</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                      <div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Pellentesque tempus aliquet nisi in sollicitudin. Aliquam tempor ligula vel mattis cursus. Cras lacus est, facilisis feugiat rhoncus ac, condimentum a ex. Aliquam elementum, nisi non dapibus dapibus, neque mi mattis libero, nec mattis tortor elit ut sapien. Donec nisi nulla, feugiat non dignissim aliquet, efficitur eget lorem. Proin id pellentesque ante.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 2</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                 	<div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                     	Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas lacinia, dolor scelerisque commodo sodales, augue lectus luctus turpis, id pharetra mauris libero at urna. Vestibulum in magna aliquam, interdum diam eu, pretium odio. Curabitur a porta metus, eget porttitor nibh. Maecenas porta condimentum lacus, in bibendum augue euismod sit amet.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 3</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                 	<div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Phasellus nec neque scelerisque, semper odio a, fringilla leo. Sed cursus lectus non purus cursus tempus. Cras eu blandit lectus. Proin sodales justo et felis consectetur, sed ultrices nibh imperdiet. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Sed aliquam congue feugiat. Nam elit orci, congue et maximus sed, commodo quis arcu. Suspendisse iaculis eros viverra consectetur pretium.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 4</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                      <div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Cras sapien leo, sodales vitae congue quis, semper ac ligula. Integer molestie fermentum suscipit. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nulla odio ligula, aliquam eget leo eget, sollicitudin fringilla ante.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>   	
                    </div>
                  </div>
                </div>
                <h2>11:00am - Noon</h2>
                <div class="sessions second-session">
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 5</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                      <div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Donec aliquet arcu at risus consequat mollis. Morbi suscipit ipsum commodo posuere faucibus. Mauris dui lacus, accumsan sed sollicitudin eget, placerat a velit.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title">Session 6</h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                      <div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Nam congue quam non elementum placerat. Vivamus egestas, ante sed imperdiet fermentum, tortor libero fermentum magna, nec bibendum mauris lacus vitae ante. Donec eu leo volutpat, consectetur libero eu, porttitor dui. Mauris nec ornare ligula. Morbi et massa viverra, malesuada velit id, faucibus metus. Duis consequat tincidunt blandit.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <div class="panel-heading">
                      <h3 class="panel-title"><span class="rountable-name">Session 7</span></h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="panel-body">
                      <div class="row">
                        <div class="col-md-9">
                          Sed turpis nisl, efficitur pharetra hendrerit ac, gravida id mi. Duis elementum velit nec risus aliquet congue et non dolor.
                        </div>
                        <div class="col-md-3 btn-row">
                            <a href="#" class="btn btn-register btn-select">Select</a>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                   	
                    </div>
                  </div>
              </div>
          <div class="slideout-form">
          <div class="slideoutform-header">
            <h3>Your Agenda</h3>
            <div class="close">X</div>
          </div>
          <div class="slideout-content">
              <div class="session-name-1"></div>
              <div class="session-name-2"></div>
              <div class="text-center">
              <a href="#registration" class="btn btn-white">Register</a>
              </div>
          </div>
        </div>
         	<h2 style="background-color:#49c5c8;">Register</h2>
            <div class="sessions conf" id="registration">
                  <div class="panel panel-default">
                    <form action="" method="post" id="regForm">
                      <div class="row">
                          <div class="col-sm-6">
                              <label>First Name <span class="required">*</span></label>
                              <input class="form-control" name="firstname" required/>
                          </div>
                          <div class="col-sm-6">
                              <label>Last Name <span class="required">*</span></label>
                              <input class="form-control" name="lastname" required/>
                          </div>
                      </div>
                      <div class="row">
                          <div class="col-sm-6">
                              <label>Email Address <span class="required">*</span></label>
                              <input class="form-control" name="email" required/>
                          </div>
                          <div class="col-sm-6">
                              <label>Company <span class="required">*</span></label>
                              <input class="form-control" name="company" required/>
                          </div>
                      </div>
                      <div class="row">
                          <div class="col-sm-6">
                              <label>Job Title <span class="required">*</span></label>
                              <input class="form-control" name="jobtitle" required/>
                          </div>
                      </div>
                      <div class="row">
                          <div class="col-md-12 optin-container">
                              <input type="checkbox" name="optin" /> Opt-in to receive communications from Sample Company including exclusive event invites, product and company updates and more
                          </div>
                      </div>
                      <input type="hidden" name="session1" />
                      <input type="hidden" name="session2" />
                      <input type="hidden" name="tractionforcereg" />
                    <div class="footer-reg text-center">
                      <input type="submit" class="btn btn-register btn-large" value="Register" />
                    </div>
                    <div class="required required-msg">
                    </div>
                    </form>
                  </div>
              </div>
            </div>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
   	
      <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
      <script src="pardot-registration-inspiration.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    </body>
</html>

The Entire JavaScript

$(document).ready(function(){
 
  // Show the Agenda
  $('.btn-select, .btn-conference').click(function(event) {
    $('.slideout-form').slideDown();
  })
 
  // Session Selection Session 1
  $('.first-session .btn-select').click(function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      $(this).addClass('session-selected');
      $(this).removeClass('btn-select');
      $(this).text('selected');
      $('.first-session .btn-select').hide();
      var selectedsession1 = $(this).closest('.panel').find('.rountable-name').text();
      $('.session-name-1').html('<div class="agenda-item"><h5>9:00am - 11:00am</h5><div class="agenda-content">' + selectedsession1 + '</div></div>');
      $('input[name=roundtable1]').val(selectedsession1);
      console.log(selectedsession1);
  });
 
  // Session Selection Session 2
  $('.second-session .btn-select').click(function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      $(this).addClass('session-selected');
      $(this).removeClass('btn-select');
      $(this).text('selected');
      $('.second-session .btn-select').hide();
      var selectedsession2 = $(this).closest('.panel').find('.rountable-name').text();
      $('.session-name-2').html('<div class="agenda-item"><h5>11:00am - NOON</h5><div class="agenda-content">' + selectedsession2 + '</div></div>');
      $('input[name=roundtable2]').val(selectedsession2);
      console.log(selectedsession2);
  });
  // Conference Selection
  $('.btn-conference').click(function(event) {
   	event.preventDefault();
      $(this).addClass('roundtable-selected');
      $(this).text('selected');
    var selectedSession3 = $(this).closest('.panel').find('.rountable-name').text();
 	$('.roundtable-name-3').html('<div class="agenda-item"><h5>NOON - 8:00pm</h5><div class="agenda-content">' + selectedSession3 + '</div></div>');
    $('input[name=eventreg]').val('true');
  });
  // Close button for the Agenda
  $('.close').click(function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      $('.slideout-form').slideUp();
  });
  // Smooth scroll for the register button
   $(function() {
    $('a[href*="#"]:not([href="#"])').click(function() {
      if (location.pathname.replace(/^\//,'') == this.pathname.replace(/^\//,'') && location.hostname == this.hostname) {
        var target = $(this.hash);
        target = target.length ? target : $('[name=' + this.hash.slice(1) +']');
        if (target.length) {
          $('html, body').animate({
            scrollTop: target.offset().top
          }, 1000);
          return false;
        }
      }
    });
  });
});

VIEW DEMO

Note: This post was originally published in April 2016 and updated in January 2023.

Original article: Inspiration: Using Pardot for Event Registration

©2023 The Spot. All Rights Reserved.

The post Inspiration: Using Pardot for Event Registration appeared first on The Spot.

By |2023-01-02T17:10:00+00:00January 2nd, 2023|Categories: Forms & Form Handlers, Getting Started, Pardot, revive, Setup & Admin|